As talk about more states allowing non-lawyer ownership of law firms is heard, concern over more deeply capitalized competition may be on the mind of some law firm leaders.  No doubt, opening up law firm capital structures to investors is significant, but it won’t change the fundamentals for surviving in today’s legal services market.  Since

The impact of COVID-19 on law firms has barely begun. When it comes to the flow of work, some firms are experiencing a measurable or even significant bump thanks to having the right practice focus at the right time: but for the most part, law firms have experienced some degree of decline in both work

For some time, law firms have felt heightened competition from not just other law firms, but also from clients moving needs in-house and alternative service providers picking off peripheral services.  As reported by Bloomberg Law in Arizona First State to Allow Nonlawyer Co-Ownership of Law Firms, looming rule or legislative changes in a number

Well run law firms annually set aside time to plan for year-end activities and decisions.  In addition to using institutional processes, systems and experience to wrap up the successful (hopefully) year, most firms use that time to plan for the coming year.  Like clockwork, important decisions for the firm’s present and future have often been

In the turmoil caused by Covid-19, many law firms have had to adjust to unforeseen circumstances.  News stories tell the sad tale of law firms being adversely impacted.  Some firms have closed, and unfortunately others will follow.

With one firm’s demise comes opportunity for others.  Clearly, personnel leaving the firm in wind-down must find homes

Covid-19 has upended law firm normalcy.  What might have been perceived last March as a couple of month hiatus from business as usual has been extended with no end in sight.  With no known end date, it can be difficult to plan in ways previously thought routine.

The current Covid-19 world for law firms can

Virtually all law firms have had to adjust business practices to address the pandemic’s impact.  Whether working remotely, refocusing or changing firm economics, making personnel moves, or partnering with clients more, today’s challenges have fundamentally changed the way law firms operate.  For the law firms grappling with too many upheavals in their world, crisis looms.

The pandemic has caused an unprecedented change to the practice of law for many law firms.  Since March, the delivery of superior client service has required a new way of thinking and a little bit of scrambling.  Yet after a couple of months living in the Covid-19 world, some law firms feel a new normal

Crisis Management Plan on an office desk and papers.

Law firm crisis typically brings financial pressure.  Reduced demand, slow-paying clients, and now due obligations incurred in better times are but a few of the hallmarks of crisis.  As bad as these things can be, the strain can intensify quickly when the

“If you throw a frog in a pot of boiling water, it will hop right out. But if you put that frog in a pot of tepid water and slowly warm it, the frog doesn’t figure out what is going on until it’s too late…” Stephenie Meyer

Much like the boiling frog, if a