Photo of Andrew E. Jillson

A founding Director of Hayse LLC, Andrew Jillson is a veteran when it comes to advising law firms and other companies on the challenges and opportunities faced by an enterprise in transition. In more than 30 years as a lawyer, he has counseled across every industry, advising wherever personnel, operational, strategic and/or legal issues converge to necessitate organizational change.

Covid-19 has impacted virtually all law firms.  A few firms have benefitted, some have suffered catastrophe, while the bulk of firms fall somewhere in the middle and forge ahead as best they can.

Whether leadership for this third group is plugging a leaky dike or simply boosting morale, the focus on short-term survival is a

Regardless of degree, Covid-19’s impact on law firms is near universal.  Some firms have been impacted so severely that crisis is their reality.  Confronted with a do or die situation, strong leadership fights to bring back normalcy.  Failure can mean disaster.

Leaders used to positive law firm performance can find themselves uncertain about their new

Covid-19’s harmful impact on some law firms shows in reduced client demand, delayed or reduced receivable realization, and production inefficiency.  While those consequences may be understandable in light of the pandemic, third parties that expect fulfillment of promises and obligations may not be totally sympathetic.  Some grace may be extended, but it is neither assured

Covid-19 and its implications for law firm stability is being experienced industry-wide.  The fallout has many firms in full-on crisis.  Reduced draws, layoffs or furloughs, expense reduction, stimulus loans have become an all too common part of the survival mix.  Resorting to these tools can help little if strong leadership fails to rise to the

The Coronavirus is causing broad-based law firm disruption.  Reports of law firms reducing draws, decreasing salaries, furloughing or laying off of lawyers and staff, and modifying summer associate programs appear daily.  Besides creating concern for health and well-being, the pandemic presents real and substantial challenges for law firms.  All firms will feel it, and some

A law firm in crisis is in a different world—a world in which leadership must learn to adapt.  It is a place that requires thinking differently, acting decisively, and making choices count.  In battling crisis mistakes inevitably happen, but successful crisis leaders keep the number and magnitude small.  A law firm leader flexes brain muscles

Thoughts on Navigating a Law Firm (Coronavirus) Crisis – continued.

Experience tells us that crisis in law firms can happen fast.  Once presented, its consequences can race past leadership’s ability to effectively respond and leave a firm reeling.  Whereas crisis traditionally caused by lawyer departure, client loss or revenue decline has often been predictable

Recent years have been good for law firms of all kinds and sizes.  But good days can’t last forever.  Whether the next downturn hurting law firms gets traced to a world-wide virus, political disruption, or just a plain old recession, it doesn’t really matter. What matters for law firms having to ride the looming bumpy

According to many law firm leaders, having a good law firm culture is a key to sustainability.  Not infrequently leaders attribute their firm’s culture for the success enjoyed.  When new mergers are announced or reviewed, the importance of compatible cultures gets top recognition.  And when law firms fail, the impact of a dysfunctional culture reaps

While law firm change is scary, in today’s evolving legal services market the absence of change may be scarier.  Law firm leaders don’t need to read expert’s opinions about the quickly moving marketplace, they see it close-up as competitors proliferate and competition intensifies.  Simply standing still by relying on tried and true practices is not