There are two primary succession challenges law firms face.  Leadership succession is one and is a vitally important step to assure a firm’s longevity.  A second kind of law firm succession involves the succession of client relationships as senior-lawyers wind-down or retire.

As hard as leadership succession can be, managing client relationship succession can be

A few law firms have had the benefit of organic preparation for succession. Their natural tendencies led to grooming the next generation for the transition of client relationships and management responsibilities. A small percentage of firms have actually executed carefully prepared formal succession plans.

But, the overwhelming majority of law firms are not prepared for

At a growing number of law firms, the Boomer generation is reaching the age when retirement among the ranks has partners leaving in increasing numbers. Numerous industry focused writings have noted an array issues faced by law firms experiencing retirements.

As partners retire, financial ramifications can be felt. The monetary payout associated with the retirement

What is your law firm worth?

This question is paramount when the owners of a firm consider the possibilities related to a merger, a succession plan involving existing firm members, or the outright sale of an established practice.

There are variations by state as to what can and cannot be sold as part of transitioning

Every year law firms of all sizes merge. For some of the smaller law firms merging, the decision to combine may have been driven by the need for an effective succession plan. In these cases in which long-time management is unenthused about the prospect of turning the keys over the next generation, merger can be

As business organizations go, law firms are different because they can face greater stability challenges.  Sure, law firms with iconic names seem to rock along year after year.  But for every bedrock firm there are others that struggle to survive.  And even some of the firms regarded for their steady state are like the proverbial

This is the second in a two part series addressing the idea of selling your law practice as part of a succession plan. Part one addressed
issues related to defining personal objectives, compliance with local bar rules, and practice valuation.

In this post we will look at three remaining considerations:

  • Finding a buyer,
  • Negotiating the

If you practice law, there is one eventuality that should be added to that familiar duo of Death and Taxes. No one talks much about it, but it warrants the same attention to detail. The subject? The end of your practice. 

As is the case with its two more familiar rivals for attention, ignoring it