Law firm mergers happen-a lot.  While the mega mergers get the publicity, many mergers stay under the radar because they involve smaller firms being absorbed by larger firms. Whether for reasons of market dynamics, succession, or battling for growth, some smaller firms simply conclude that life will be better as part of a bigger shop.

If you practice law, there is one eventuality that should be added to that familiar duo of Death and Taxes. No one talks much about it, but it warrants the same attention to detail. The subject? The end of your practice. 

As is the case with its two more familiar rivals for attention, ignoring it

Law firm mergers have been in the news with combinations being announced seemingly every week.  So far in 2018, the many mergers closed have drawn the attention of the media and law firm leaders alike.  The rationale for any of the announced mergers depends on the specific transaction and the firms involved.  Whatever the reason,

For many law firms, succession to the next generation presents a formidable and daunting challenge.  Leadership may have been too busy to plan ahead for succession.  Turnover at the firm may have dealt a blow to the goal of grooming someone to step in as the next leader.  Sometimes the next generation’s business development abilities

As firms consider their strategic position , a number of law firms are finding themselves underperforming relative to peer firms. For some, it is deja vu…for the second, third or fourth consecutive year.

You don’t need anyone to tell you that this is not a great way to navigate in this increasingly volatile environment. A

If your law firm is considering a merger, it is a perfect time to evaluate the operating cost associated with the combined organizations.

Mergers are risky transactions. Having operating costs in line will decrease pressure on the new entity.

Although all costs should be evaluated, we will focus on three areas in this post. Two

The spring of 2018 has produced a spate of large law firm mergers.  Despite this noticeable activity, the interest in mergers is not something new-over 600 mergers and acquisitions have closed since 2007.  Based on the tactic’s popularity among firm leaders seeking a competitive edge, we can expect more mergers in the future.

For law

This Forbes article references a KPMG study which indicated that 83% of mergers fail to yield a favorable return to stockholders while a separate A. T. Kearney study determined that mergers overall yield a negative return to owners. The KPMG study indicated that nearly 70% of business combinations are negative to neutral in terms of

Already 2018 has proven to be a time for law firm merger.  Since the beginning of the year we have been treated to a constant series of announcements about law firms combining. And although law firm mergers have been part of the landscape for years, the increase in law firm mergers shows its growing popularity